Posted April 20, 2013

Watch Jean Segura get thrown out stealing second after having already stolen it

baserunning, Jean Segura, rule changes
Jean Segura stole second and was then caught stealing second in the same game Friday against Chicago. (Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)

Jean Segura stole second and was then caught stealing second in the same inning Friday against Chicago. (Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)

In the eighth inning of Friday night’s game between the Brewers and Cubs, Milwaukee shortstop Jean Segura led off the inning with a single, stole second, got caught in a run-down attempting to steal third, wound up on second base at the same time as Ryan Braun, retreated safely to first base, then made the final out of the inning by being thrown out attempting to steal second for the second time in the inning. Confused? Watch this:

When Braun and Segura both wound up at second base, Segura, as the leading runner, had the right to the bag, so Braun was out when he was tagged by Cubs third baseman Luis Valbuena even though he was standing on the base. However, Valbuenna, though he tagged Segura twice, never tagged him off the base (if you pause the video on the second tag you can clearly see Segura’s left toe on the base), so Segura was able to retreat safely to first base, though he needn’t have done so. He was safe on second.

Rule 7.08(i) states that runners should be declared out for ” run[ning] the bases in reverse order for the purpose of confusing the defense or making a travesty of the game.” That rule was put into place in 1920 in response to a few isolated incidents of players, most famously Germany Schaefer, attempting to draw a throw at second base for the purpose of allowing a teammate on third base to steal home on a delayed double steal, failing to draw the throw, stealing first on the next pitch, and trying again. However, a comment associated with the rule states that if the runner “is decoyed into returning to the base he last touched,” he may return safely to that base (assuming he’s not tagged out).

Clearly there’s was an interpretation to be made on the part of the umpires, and the umpires in this case ruled, correctly, that Segura returned to first out of confusion, not to “make a travesty of the game,” though he came awfully close.

10 comments
irwin.jake99
irwin.jake99

Why didn't the batter swing on the pitch of the second steal?  There were already two outs, so there was no downside of Segura being doubled-off of the bag... And if everyone knew that Segura was stealing, why not just turn it into a hit-and-run situation?  The pitch was a meatball over the plate...

playrighter
playrighter

It may be  too old for the younger fans, but Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First" would certainly fit here.

Wisconsin Death Trip
Wisconsin Death Trip

I was blog'n this game as it was being shown on the cable TV....this play was re-DQ-lous from the get-go. What amazes me more than anything is the idiot ump on second...looking right at the play, and missing the OBVIOUS double out. Time to start looking for a new job rookie.....

learntherules
learntherules

@Wisconsin Death Trip Time to read a rulebook, rookie.  Braun was out as the trailing runner.  It was Segura's base, so he's not out - unless he's tagged while off the bag.  He wasn't.  So he's not out.  Therefore, YOU'RE the idiot.

caleb
caleb

@learntherules @Wisconsin Death Trip Those are awful strong words from someone who is wrong. Segura was tagged while off the bag. The first tag he was still on, but he took his hand off the bag and they tagged him again. Watch the video and listen to the announcers.

JaBacon_Mon
JaBacon_Mon

@learntherules - you're also a moron if you think that the announcers in the boot are only watching the game from an eagle-eye view.  You DO realize that they have monitors up there, right?  Do you really think they'd be able to tell what's a ball and what's a strike and what types of pitches are being thrown if they were only watching it from hundreds of feet in the air BEHIND the plate?

learntherules
learntherules

@caleb@learntherules@Wisconsin Death TripSo we're now going by announcers to determine the rules?  Oh, well, that's just FINE then.  Since we're going by the word of people about 200 yards from the play, that means we can use the author of this blog, then, since he's as credible as any announcer:  "though he tagged Segura twice, never tagged him off the base (if you pause the video on the second tag you can clearly see Segura’s left toe on the base),"

So there you go.