Posted November 04, 2013

New York Times report alleges A-Rod tested positive for banned stimulant in 2006

Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis
Alex Rodriguez, Yankees

Alex Rodriguez is appealing his 211-game suspension with a decision expected before year’s end. (David Karp/AP)

In a major front-page story in Monday morning’s edition, the New York Times has put forth its findings from months of investigation into the allegations being levied by both sides in Alex Rodriguez’s ongoing arbitration proceedings against Major League Baseball. Among the notable new details is the fact that, according to “two people involved with baseball’s collectively bargained drug-testing program,” Rodriguez tested positive for a banned stimulant in 2006.

The article also details some of the hundreds of thousands of dollars spent by both sides to obtain evidence and the cooperation of witnesses, as well as some of the alleged threats used by MLB to get witnesses to cooperate. Those are just some of the other attention-grabbing details of a story in which neither MLB nor Rodriguez’s camp comes out looking particularly good.

Assuming Rodriguez did indeed test positive for stimulants in 2006, that’s actually just a footnote among all the rest of the cloak-and-dagger absurdity detailed by the Times. Stimulants are considered separate from performance enhancing drugs under the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, with a separate schedule of discipline which requires no suspension or public announcement following a first positive test such as Rodriguez’s in 2006.

Instead, a first positive test for simulants triggers a series of subsequent tests over the following year. Given that A-Rod was never suspended for stimulants, it is safe to assume he passed those tests. Even if Rodriguez was a chronic user of banned stimulants, this case would not have built to such an extreme. Rather, it is about MLB’s allegations of hardcore PED use on Rodriguez’s part and his denial of the same, as well as the player’s allegations of unfair treatment and illegal investigative tactics on the part of Major League Baseball. As fascinating as the New York Times story is — and it is definitely worth a read — it gets us no closer to the truth on either matter.

Rodriguez is appealing his 211-game suspension for his alleged role in the Biogenesis scandal that resulted in suspensions of at least 50 games for 13 other players. An arbitrator is expected to rule on A-Rod’s case sometime next month.

25 comments
wlewisiii
wlewisiii

Ah, baseball. Proving once again it's a sport fit only for the cheats & thugs that play it and slime that own it. 

May MLB disappear before the end of the decade.

DavidNYC
DavidNYC

The issue is that MLB believes by making A Rod the poster child of steroids, they will be seen to have conclusively addressed the problem.  Ha!  Ortiz mentioned below is one of many that has escaped scrutiny. It helps that Ortiz is a lot more likable than Alex, but still.

A Rod does not belong in the game for the simple reason that he has flaunted this in everyone's face for years and believes he is innocent because his lawyers tell him so.  I think back to the days when the Yankees were lead by the Boss, who took pity on those who wanted to change their life and try again -- like Strawberry.  George would never have paid this guy or kept someone with his reputation.  Alex hates the game of baseball and laughs at the fans -- he sees himself as superior to everyone.

But this does not address the issue of MLB being duplicitous.  If drugs are not allowed, then why announce the suspensions months in advance to let players negotiate?  If Alex is so bad, then ban him...Rose never tried to draw other players into drugs and gambling.  What Selig refuses to accept is that he created this monster after the 1994 series was cancelled.  Afraid that no one wold watch, it was the one time ticket prices were not increased and all agreed to look the other way as all eyes were on the Home Run chase.   Shameful behavior from the sport itself.

After all, it is just a business, but this nonsense has made baseball lose its appeal for many...for good.  Set a zero tolerance rule, help players understand the consequences (to themselves and to the careers) and treat this issue at the right level.

But no, baseball wants a good story in the press.  Get rid of Alex, but not this way.  The Yankees will let him go either way, because there is no way they want him back and baseball will end up playing this so poorly it will make a mockery of the anti doping era.

ineedataxi
ineedataxi

When will  this klown just go away

chipdavis
chipdavis

Players taint the game, MLB taints the sport. The power of money ruins all things.

bcrd500
bcrd500

How many stories does it take about Rodriguez using drugs to gain an advantage, on the field, for MLB and the Yankees to ban or sit him, on the bench? 

It is a disgrace that New York put him, in the lineup, and allowed him to pass Stan Musical, in career RBIs, and tie Lou Gehrig, for career grand slams. 

Rodriguez, Bonds, McGwire, and Sosa have already been allowed to distort season and career home run stats and it falls to MLB to go something along the lines of the NCAA (removing wins from teams and coaches for rules violations) to restore the rightful owners of the single season record (Maris) and career record (Aaron). If MLB allows Bonds to cheat his way to the top of the record book, twenty years from now, most fans will be unaware that Bonds used PEDs to surpass Maris and Aaron. 

An example of the above is current TV pundits constantly state that Beltran is tied with Babe Ruth for post-season home runs. Only older fans know that NONE of Beltran's homers were hit during the World Series while ALL of Ruth's were hit during the World Series. TV pundits, except Keith Olbermann, have devalued World Series home runs by mixing them with post-season home runs.




RobinFarbman
RobinFarbman

  He was seeing Madonna around then. Maybe he needed a little something extra.

tony34
tony34

i wonder how many more Big papi failed but the press loves him so you never hear about them. sad.

DanaBunner
DanaBunner

Yankees should release him, no matter what the finding.  In addition to all of the PED usage, he's suing their team.   You don't want this guy in your clubhouse.  Besides, he hit just .244 and had only 19 RBIs in 44 games while hitting in the middle of the lineup.  He turns 39 next July.  He's not worth having around.  I can't imagine any other team picking him up.  Way too much controversy for so little production.

Jerry11
Jerry11

You know the best thing about Barry Bonds?  He's gone.  We don't hear a thing about him!!  Do you hear that A-Roid?  GO AWAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

KeysSteven
KeysSteven

A-rod?  Yawn.  Anything on current, relevant MLB'ers, Cliff, with emphasis on those who've had recent resurgance in power & production that helped carry their team into the playoffs?

And while we're on topic: Will every major leaguer have his blood drawn at least once in '14 for HGH testing?  No hurry on this one, got all winter. 

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

I find this so hard to believe, don't all you?

NoQNoSuperBowl
NoQNoSuperBowl

I wonder which one of Bud Selig's lap dogs released this little tidbit.

William27
William27

the whole world of professional sports is disgusting.

he is just the tip of the iceberg

stabmasterarson21
stabmasterarson21

aROID has allegedly been using PEDs since HS.  Wish someone would go find somebody to verify so we can get this cheater out of baseball.  

mr.mojorising1234
mr.mojorising1234

@wlewisiii thats a pretty narrow way to look at it. how about the real way which is that baseball is the only sport that cares about getting rid of drugs in their league whereas all other sports or more than happy to let their players do whatever they want ot get an advatage so long as it bumps up the sport's viewership. its called integrity, look it up.

MiaGioia
MiaGioia

@DavidNYCIt wasn't announced months in advance. Most players took their punishments, and did the suspension thing right away. It's Rodriguez who fought it and dragged it on and on and on and on.

Matthew53
Matthew53

@RobinFarbman 

Sure he did. The 50 year old Madonna is anti-viagra.....can't blame him there. 

DanaBunner
DanaBunner

@tony34 Press would jump all over it if the evidence were there.  The NY Times would love to run such a story.

MiaGioia
MiaGioia

@Jerry11We hear about Bonds every time someone gets caught juicing again.

Sometimes it's McGwire (who deserves MORE of the blame for this mess), sometimes Sosa.

But always Bonds, as if he were the only player who cheated.

Lufts
Lufts

@KeysSteven Since even supporters of the test for Hgh only claim that it has a window of 24 hours (when in fact, it's ability to detect exogenous hormone is highly suspect), once a year means nothing.
In addition, no one uses steroids or Hgh anymore unless they know nothing.  The stuff they use to get their own bodies to produce more naturally can't be detected unless it is looked for specifically (hcg and IVF1 and others)

Kerry B
Kerry B

@stabmasterarson21 know what I find AMAZING about this.  Back in the 60's and probably even before that there were BOWLS of uppers in clubhouses that players took REPEATEDLY.  And if you don't think that they could have helped it shows just how narrow minded and ignorant people are.  So ponder this:  Say a player in the 70's through the 90's used uppers every day so he COULD play at a higher level for games he might otherwise have been TIRED or HUNG OVER or just worn out.  Baseball is a LONG season, and plenty of players have OPENLY talked about these pills being done and available.  Are they cheaters.  What happened if it made a 275 hitter a 300 hitter and made the HOF??

Fast forward to AROD. I am in NO WAY saying what he did is right.  BUT, I am saying that why is this so called list of over 100 players not getting out.  Why is his name the ONLY name and why was HE the only one who had to respond.  Why is Big Papi allowed a pass?  Or all the others who are on the list.  Know what I say is fair?  OUT THEM ALL.  IF the Commissioner is really about cleaning up baseball name them all.  Make all of them answer questions.  Make all of them say what they did.  And EVERY person who has ever tested positive for ANYTHING be outed.  THEN he would be taken seriously.  

But because everyone hates AROD he is the villan.  How would any of you feel if say Jeter or Mo or Ripken or Schilling or Randy Johnson were to be on that list??  I just find it perplexing that no one sees how some of this really seems odd that Baseball is after AROD becuase he FOUGHT the suspension (and the MLB hardheads as well).

Want to clean it up.  Out everyone.  Then you will make them either stop or realize getting caught will make all their hard work mean nothing.  And oh by the way, maybe if they do cheat VOID the contract.  See how fast THAT will clean up baseball.

SIMPLE SOLUTION.  Test everyone now.  Tell everyone they have 6 months to clean up.  Test everyone 6 months later.  If you fail both tests.....you are OUTED and suspended and CONTRACT VOIDED.  IF ANYONE GETS CAUGHT 6 months later then they deserve the punishment.

decredico
decredico

@DODGERFAIL2013 @William27 you're the fool for not realizing he is correct.... these sports are all for boy-men that never grew up emotionally ... like you 

SeanBrower
SeanBrower

@Kerry B @stabmasterarson21 I think the difference here is the fact that A-Rod lied for so long. In addition, even when he admitted it, in 2009, MLB still allowed him to play for 4 years. A-Rod's punishment is therefore a combination of him using steroids, lying about it and MLB making up for lost time by punishing him an amount that they deem makes up for the amount of time they missed. As for Big Papi, he was never told what he tested positive for. Plus, Ortiz said that at the time of his positive test, he was taking vitamins and supplements that probably triggered the positive test. Do I adamantly agree with the unprecedented suspension of A-Rod or Ortiz's statement? No, but it is clear that with Ortiz, MLB has no evidence to suspend him. With A-Rod, on the other hand, it is clear, for the first time, that A-Rod not only admitted to steroid use, but based on the New York Times article, actually did take them. The evidence of his drug use, his lying to the world and MLB's desire to make up for lost time and put and end to PED usage in baseball once and for all have all contributed to this huge punishment. But as I said, I do not necessarily agree with the length. Yet, for what he did, he will pay dearly.