Posted January 08, 2014

Maddux, Glavine, Thomas elected to Hall of Fame; Biggio falls just short

Hall of Fame
Greg Maddux

Greg Maddux won 355 games and four Cy Youngs in 23 seasons in the majors. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Craig Biggio finished with 74.8 percent, missing election by two votes and thus falling painfully shy of the 75 percent threshold needed for induction. Mike Piazza, like Biggio a second-year candidate, was fifth with 62 percent. Jack Morris got 61.5 percent in his 15th and final year on the BBWAA ballot.

Jeff Bagwell, a longtime Astros teammate of Biggio’s, had 46.1 percent. Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds, arguably the greatest pitcher and hitter in baseball history but both linked to performance-enhancing drugs, each lost ground and are still a long way from gaining induction. Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young winner, got 35.4 percent while Bonds, a seven-time MVP, received 34.7 percent.

Maddux was a four-time National League Cy Young winner for the Cubs and Braves, winning the award every year from 1992-95. He was thought to have a chance to be the first candidate ever to get 100 percent of the vote until an MLB.com writer on Tuesday became the first to reveal a ballot that did not have the 18-time Gold Glover on it. Maddux ultimately didn’t get 16 votes but still finished with 97.2 percent.

Glavine, who won 305 games and two NL Cy Young awards, got 91.9 percent of the vote.

Thomas won back-to-back American League MVP awards in 1993 and ’94 and finished with 521 home runs for the White Sox, Blue Jays and A’s. He landed 83.7 percent of the vote.

This is the first time since 1999, when George Brett, Nolan Ryan and Robin Yount were elected, that the writers have voted in three first-timers on the same ballot.

Among other first-timers, Mike Mussina (20.3 percent) and Jeff Kent (15.2 percent) will hang around for next year’s ballot.

As for players connected to PEDs, Mark McGwire dropped to 11.0 percent and Sammy Sosa fell to 7.2 percent. They will remain on the ballot. The same can’t be said for Rafael Palmeiro, who garnered just 4.4 percent and will no longer be eligible by the BBWAA. Palmeiro was one of just four players with 500 home runs and 3,000 hits but also failed a test for performance-enhancing drugs late in 2005, his final season.

Managers Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa and Joe Torre were voted to the Hall of Fame by the Expansion Era committee at last month’s winter meetings. Cox managed Maddux and Glavine for a decade in Atlanta during the heart of the Braves’ dynasty that included their 1995 World Series triumph.

There were 571 voters on this year’s BBWAA ballot. The ceremonies will take place on July 27 in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Here are the voting results for all 35 players on this year’s ballot. Players needed 429 votes for election and 29 votes to avoid falling off the ballot altogether:

Player Votes Pct. Years on ballot
Greg Maddux 555 97.2 1
Tom Glavine 525 91.9 1
Frank Thomas 478 83.7 1
Craig Biggio 427 74.8 2
Mike Piazza 355 62.2 2
Jack Morris 351 61.5 15
Jeff Bagwell 310 54.3 4
Tim Raines 263 46.1 7
Roger Clemens 202 35.4 2
Barry Bonds 198 34.7 2
Lee Smith 171 29.9 12
Curt Schilling 167 29.2 2
Edgar Martinez 144 25.2 5
Alan Trammell 119 20.8 13
Mike Mussina 116 20.3 1
Jeff Kent 87 15.2 1
Fred McGriff 67 11.7 5
Mark McGwire 63 11.0 5
Larry Walker 58 10.2 4
Don Mattingly 47 8.2 14
Sammy Sosa 41 7.2 2
Rafael Palmeiro 25 4.4 4
Moises Alou 6 1.1 1
Hideo Nomo 6 1.1 1
Luis Gonzalez 5 0.9 1
Eric Gagne 2 0.4 1
J.T. Snow 2 0.4 1
Armando Benitez 1 0.2 1
Jacque Jones 1 0.2 1
Kenny Rogers 1 0.2 1
Sean Casey 0 0.0 1
Ray Durham 0 0.0 1
Todd Jones 0 0.0 1
Paul Lo Duca 0 0.0 1
Richie Sexson 0 0.0 1
175 comments
captrontv
captrontv

I'm perfectly fine with the writers who will not vote for those connected with PEDs.  However if you cast a vote for J.T. Snow, Armando Benitez, etc., then you should have your voting privilege revoked.  I'm not sure what is worse, voting for them because you have a personal relationship with the player or if you think their play is actually deserving.  

LarsJustinen
LarsJustinen

Too bad Edgar Martinez played his entire career in the Pacific Northwest. He was one of the most feared hitters in the game in his day, but most people in the East were heading to bed or watching Carson when he was mowing down pitchers. If he'd played for the Yankees or Cardinals, he'd be in the Hall by now. 

taiwan
taiwan

Every single year people kept complaining about the few voters not voting for a clear HOF. This year there were 16 people not voting for Greg Maddux. Five years ago 28 people didn't vote for Rickey Henderson. You're talking about the most stolen bases and arguably the best ever at taking pitches. Barry Bonds broke Rickey's walk record because people were afraid of letting him hit. But the last thing pitchers wanted was to walk Rickey Henderson. But he earned all those walks by not swinging at pitches out of strike zone because he knew if he got on base it was as good as a double or triple. If he got on base you knew he probably would score. He was every pitcher's nightmare. But 28 people thought Rickey Henderson didn't cut it. We can go on and on. But the fact is he and Maddux both got elected. Just because they didn't break Tom Seaver's record doesn't mean they were lesser HOF. Babe Ruth should have received 100% of the votes, but he didn't. Let's leave it at that. People like the 16 that didn't vote for Maddux never have cost someone their admission to HOF on the first year.


I had no problem with anyone not voting Maddux. In fact I'd wished if some of Maddux's votes could go to Piazza or Bagwell and get two more elected so there are two less on the ballot next year. The problem with Ken Gurnick wasn't that he didn't vote for Maddux. My problem with him is that he wasted his vote by not voting anybody (other than Jack Morris). Next year we're going to have Pedro, Smoltz, and Randy Johnson. It's not going to get easier getting more than two voted into HOF.

taiwan
taiwan

Couple of years ago there was an article by Joe Posnanski comparing Curt Schilling and Kevin Brown. The stats were so similar it's impossible to argue Curt Schilling was a better pitcher. Even Jay Jaffe listed Kevin Brown as a pitcher who got overlooked. He received less than what Rafael Palmeiro received to be eliminated from the ballot. I don't understand why Curt Schilling received more votes than Mike Mussina too.


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/joe_posnanski/03/30/schilling.brown/index.html

howboutthis?
howboutthis?

Who are the four voters who voted for Clemens but not Bonds? That's just weird.

howboutthis?
howboutthis?

Tough ballot. I'm glad Walker stayed on.

mantle77777
mantle77777

Fred McGriff belongs in the HOF.  Look at his numbers compared to Willie Stargell.  Almost identical with McGriff having a slight edge in some areas.  I think Stargell went in on the first ballot.  What's going on here?

Serena
Serena

Define irony, Managers who padded their win totals to the point they get inducted into the Hall of Fame on the back of players who used PED's who will never get inducted into the Hall of Fame

Bledred
Bledred

Have you seen the twitter picture of Glavine when he found out he won lol.  Looks like someone just told him his dog died. 

evangelio
evangelio

Edgar Martinez deserves the hall...  same with Biggio

UBERTAXTHERICH
UBERTAXTHERICH

MidwestGolfFan is just a raging bigot trapped in the closet, pls pay him no mind.

KeysSteven
KeysSteven

Ironic, maybe more disturbing, that the man most responsible for run-production of those terrific Braves' teams in the 90s in Fred McGriff, who compiled HOF-worthy RS numbers, was a PS performer (.303 / 10 hr / 37 rbi / 188 ab), a pretty nifty fielder, no PED suspicions I'm aware of and appeared a solid citizen, on & off field, receives just 11.7%, while the manager (Cox) and heart of the pitching (Greg / Tom) are over-whelming vote-ins and some in the media have audacity to whine for want of unanimity.


Biggio will get in soon enough, Morris has Veterans Cmte and Kent & Mussina have Barry Larkin & Don Sutton as standards, so consider this kick-off of the 'Fred McGriff Cooperstown Campaign.' 

x72
x72

The real shame here is that "The Mayor" didn't get 1 single solitary vote.

Bledred
Bledred

Tough break for Biggio, but he will be in next year with Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, and John Smoltz.

Richard--Ramirez
Richard--Ramirez

Ffs, put Biggio in the hall. Unreal to keep a guy out that's .2 percentage points away.

Riverotter
Riverotter

How cool would it be for Frank Thomas to refuse induction until his friend Bagwell can join him? 

JeffreyHaas
JeffreyHaas

Can I just point out that Jaques Jones and Armando Benitez each got one vote for the HOF and Biggio lost by two votes. Just saying...

Bledred
Bledred

Congrats Frank!  I am so happy for you and the White Sox organization.  You earned being a 1st rounder!  Also a tip of the cap to Glavine and Maddux.  Mad Dog being one of my favorite pitchers growing up. 

Richard--Ramirez
Richard--Ramirez

Good move by the Cubbies getting rid of that Maddux kid, his career will never amount to a hill of beans.

PAZSKY
PAZSKY

Somebody actually voted for Armando Benitez and Jaque Jones?? Was that a joke ballot?

Ray1950
Ray1950

I am CONVINCED Bonds and Clemens would have been inducted by now IF they hadn't gone the "cream" and "needle" route. But they did.  Now, it can be said that MLB looked the other way while all this was going on (and I suspect they did) but there's no way sportswriters, who love having this hold over the "people's hall," will vote them in. It gives them that feeling of superiority they crave.

JohnG1
JohnG1

@howboutthis?I agree. Though I think there's actually more than four, as I've seen some ballots that have Bonds but not Clemens (the vote tracker has five ballots with Bonds and not Clemens and one ballot with Clemens and not Bonds, but that only amounts for 184--about a third of the total--ballots), which is equally weird. Since Clemens had four more votes overall, there must have been at least eight additional ballots with him and not Bonds. So that's a minimum of 13 with one but not the other, though I'm guessing the real number is probably about twice that.

taiwan
taiwan

@howboutthis? We don't really know there are four. It's possible some people voted for Bonds and but not Clemens. My guess is Clemen's acquittal was good enough for some voters.

Michael10
Michael10

@mantle77777You've got to look at those stats in the context of the era they played in. McGriff's career largely coincided with the offensive boom that was foreshadowed by the 1986-87 spike and was here to stay by 1993. When Stargell retired, he was 14th on the all-time HR list, 23rd in RBI, 25th in slugging and 33rd in OPS+; today, McGriff ranks 26th, 42th, 77th and 119th in those categories. Besides sweeping the MVP awards in 1979 (NL, NLCS and World Series), Stargell finished in the top 3 three other times; McGriff never did. Stargell was perceived as a team leader and the face of a franchise for 21 years; McGriff was perceived as a "slugger for hire," playing for six different team and not more than 4-1/2 seasons at any one stop. 


Yes, the raw numbers are similar, but the gap between the legacies of Stargell and McGriff are much greater than 10 RBIs or 18 homeruns...

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@mantle77777 

Stargell was a great leader.  "Pops" and "We are family," and all that.  He was the captain of 2 WS teams.  

McGriff collected stats, but was not a great leader. 

Therein lies the difference.  Some things stats don't address.

muser
muser

@UBERTAXTHERICH Please...go to the CNN or Yahoo site and be an idiot. It seems normal there. Go away. 

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@UBERTAXTHERICH 

And you are an authoritarian scold attempting to silence someone who doesn't subscribe to your immoral left-wing obsessions.

There.  Now we're even, except I'm right.  Remember, you started it.

Michael10
Michael10

@KeysStevenThe man most responsible for the Braves run production during those years was Chipper Jones (and later Andruw Jones). But those teams' ultimate success owed much more to run prevention -- which is why even Smoltz will garner more HOF support than McGriff.

howboutthis?
howboutthis?

@KeysSteven I'm with you on McGriff, but anyone who didn't vote Maddux doesn't know baseball. Period.

mantle77777
mantle77777

@KeysSteven I just compared Fred McGriff lifetime stats to Willie Stargell and they are almost identical.  Yes Stargell won an MVP and McGriff did not, but McGriff put up some big numbers in his career and was a consistant winner for a long time.  He should be in the HOF. 

Michael10
Michael10

@BledredNo way Smoltz is a first ballot HOFer. He should garner support in the Mussina to Schilling range, but may do a bit better -- not because he was any better on the mound, but because he'll be riding the same '90s nostalgia train out of Atlanta that got Glavine in on the first try.

mantle77777
mantle77777

@Bledred I hope that's true.  Sometimes guys votes go down when they are up against tough competition.  I'm not sure about Smoltz going in on the first ballot though.

Chuckster
Chuckster

@Richard--RamirezIt's not grade school.  The requirement isn't a "minimum of around 75%".   It is what it is.  He'll get in next year.

Michael10
Michael10

@RiverotterIt would be cooler if Biggio did so -- and much less likely to happen...

JohnG1
JohnG1

@Richard--RamirezTo be fair, he was a free agent, so it's not like they traded him. But yeah, they should have paid what he and Scott Boras were looking for.

Ray1950
Ray1950

@PAZSKY They may have mistaken Jacque Jones for Jack Jones and thought to themselves, "Wow, I remember when Jack sang the theme song for 'The Love Boat' ... 

sportsGuy12
sportsGuy12

those two votes should be given to Biggio

Wombat
Wombat

@Ray1950 Baseball did look the other way, (especially during the McGwire/Sosa HR race as that excitement brought many fans back to baseball), but the organization is reaping now what was sown then in the scandals and asterisks in baseball history.

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@Ray1950 

In other words, you favor glorifying amoral cheaters with their profession's highest honor.

Says more about you than about the writers.

howboutthis?
howboutthis?

@taiwan @howboutthis? That's even weirder. Who decides that they're okay with steroids and keeps either of those guys off? Bonds was acquited as well...

JohnG1
JohnG1

@mantle77777@BledredI'm fairly certain Biggio gets in next year. With three inductees going in this year, next year's ballot won't be any more loaded than it was this year. And he was only two votes away. He'll get in.

Michael10
Michael10

@howboutthis?@JeffreyHaasWho's to say the vanity voters even used a full ten votes? No one is required to cast a maximum ballot. 

It's very unlikely a writer said "Hmmm, there are ten guys here I think are bona fide Hall of Famers, but I've got to bump one to make room for Jaques Jones..."

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@UBERTAXTHERICH@muser 

You were all over the Kluwe story ranting about how wonderful gayness is.

Now, being the tolerant leftist you are, you use it as an insult.  

Hmmm.  Neither consistent nor tolerant nor coherent.  Just like all of your posts.


MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@Chessmaster@MidwestGolfFan 

At least I've got traditional morality on my side.  You know, right and wrong and all that other old-fashioned stuff that the shrinks say doesn't matter.  Well, it does.

You've got emotion and fuzzy thinking on your side.

Chuckster
Chuckster

@AndrewEden-Balfour@MidwestGolfFan@Ray1950Cheating occurs all the time in every sport.  Everyone is trying to gain an advantage of some sort.  The difference is 1) What Rose did was clearly outlined and the punishment clear. 2)  Use of steriods is a) illegal unless prescribed and b) banned by MLB.  Punishment again to fit the crime and suspensions handed out accordingly.  What Perry did like others is doctor the ball a little to gain that advantage...difference is the punishment (fitting the crime) is ejection and was clearly documented.  Could have been a ban, but wasn't and still isn't.   So players that KNOWINGLY violate the PED policy or MLB rules regarding such things as gambling do so KNOWING the punishment BEFORE they do it.  To complain or try to change that punishment afterwards is pathetic.

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@AndrewEden-Balfour@MidwestGolfFan@Ray1950 

MLB still indirectly allows spitballs; I remember watching pitchers lick their hands (yuck!) then rubbing the ball -- that's legal.

But you still have to throw the darn thing in a way that batters will miss or mis-hit the ball.

Unlike PEDs:  juice up, you become bigger and stronger, and more athletic than nature ever intended your body to be.   

And you're using a cheezy humor website to back your claim that PEDs are OK?

Ray1950
Ray1950

@MidwestGolfFan That said, anyone who thinks sportswriters are the best way to vote players into the hall is dreaming.